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Your Job Search Network - 62,500 People Strong

In this economy -- or any other -- all my research and experience points to one fact.

It's this.

Up to 70-80% of your success in finding a job hinges on your ability to build and use a network of contacts -- people who can alert you to new job openings and help you get hired.

When you are referred to a hiring manager by one of their employees, you benefit from the trust that exists between them. And it gives you an almost unfair advantage over other job seekers who come in via the classified ads or the Internet. It's like cutting to the front of the checkout line.

You may have already known that. But did you know there's an army of volunteers -- 62,500 people strong -- sitting right under your nose, waiting to send you job leads?

It's true.

Now. Do you think you MIGHT get an interview or two every week if you had 62,500 pairs of eyes and ears on the lookout for job openings?

Well, you do! Because, according to most research, the average person is acquainted with about 250 other people. And those 250 people know 250 more.

Multiply the two and you get 62,500 people, enough to fill Ross-Ade Stadium at the University of Purdue.

This huge figure is the true value of your network. Because it's not just who YOU know, it's who THEY know that counts.

So right now -- today -- please do these 3 things.

Step 1 - Write down the name of every single person you know, from friends and family to casual acquaintances. That includes your CPA, attorney, hair stylist, manicurist, pastor, dentist, banker, real estate agent, neighbors and pastor, to name just a few.

Put special emphasis on listing affluent people (most wealthy people own their own business or know someone who does) and centers of influence (local leaders who know the movers in shakers in town, like pastors, superstar real estate agents and attorneys).

Don't stop writing until you have at least 250 names.

Step 2 - Contact 10 people a day for the next 25 days and say these words when you call or write: "I'm looking for a position where I can help a ___ company with my expertise in ____. Who do you that I could talk to?" Try to get at least 3 names from each person.

Be sure to THANK your contacts for every name they give you. Then, ask each contact to please pass your name and phone number on to anyone they think of later whom you might be able to help.

(Notice, you're not begging for a job here. You're offering to help a company with your expertise. Big difference. And it gives you the enthusiasm that encourages others to respond.)

Step 3 - Pick up the phone, call each potential job lead and follow this script: "My friend, Joe Jones, in Chicago told me to give you a call. I'm a manufacturing manager in Minneapolis and Joe said you would know who to talk to for advice. For the past ___ years I've specialized in ____ and I'm looking for a company that needs to get the most out of its ____. Who do you know that I should be talking to?"

If that person can't help you directly, he or she should give you the name of someone who can.

Using a script is important, because you can practice until it flows naturally. And be sure to stand up when you make your phone calls -- this gives your voice an extra dose of vitality, a definite plus.

Remember: the worst that can happen when you make a networking call is that someone you approach won't be able to help. But that just puts you one step closer to someone who can. Networking is simply a numbers game, one with 62,500 people on your side.

Best of luck to you!

-Kevin Donlin
Kevin Donlin owns and operates G-uaranteed Resumes. Since 1995, he has provided resumes, cover letters and online job-search assistance to clients on five continents.

Kevin Donlin, Managing Editor of 1 Day Resumes and author of "Resume and Cover Letter Secrets Revealed," a do-it-yourself manual that will help you find a job in 30 days ... or your money back. For more information, visit www.1dayresumes.com
Copyright by Kevin Donlin