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December 17, 2017

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Three Job Search Tips for 2002

The job market in 2002 may be the toughest in 10 years.

That's the bad news.

The good news?

If other job seekers competing for the position you want don't put in the extra effort that YOU'RE surely capable of, they'll fall by the wayside.

And you'll find the right job faster.

Here are three ways to stand out and get that job in 2002.

  1. Be specific about what you want!
    I can't tell you how many clients say: "I don't know what I want to do, but I can tell you that I don't want to be flipping burgers."

    That's not enough!

    Do you want to work in international finance? Product development? Start by identifying the career path that appeals to you. If you can't do that, list 3-4 skills you'd be happy using every day. Then gear your resume towards this specific goal.

    Remember: You can't hit a target you can't see. By pinpointing a job, you can pick companies that are the right fit for you.

  2. Write a resume that's focused on achievements and results.
    Throughout your resume, emphasize the good things you've done before -- and can do again.

    When your resume is competing against hundreds of others for an employer's attention, you MUST make it easy for any reader to see how valuable you really are.

    Again, be specific. Use dollars and numbers to prove your claims. Example: "Created and managed Client Solutions Division in 2000. In one year, gained 70% of market share against Siemens, while meeting revenue goal of $256,000."

  3. Network like mad. Your career depends on this!
    According to a survey in the Wall Street Journal, 61% of jobs are filled through networking. That's nearly two out of three.

    Tell everyone you know that you're job hunting. Call or email every name in your address book. Get business cards made with "Employment Goal: INSERT YOURS" as your title ... and hand them out.

    At the end of every conversation with an employment contact, ask: "Who else do you know that I should be talking to?" They'll tell you. This one question can make your network grow like crabgrass in July.

    Even former employers can help. If you parted on good terms with your last boss, he or she might be able to refer you to hiring managers in other companies with openings.

Here's hoping 2002 is your best year ever in terms of career fulfillment, happiness and prosperity!

Best of luck to you!

-Kevin Donlin
Owner, Guaranteed Resumes
www.gresumes.com
Author of "Resume and Cover Letter Secrets Revealed," a do-it-yourself manual that will help you find a job in 30 days ... or your money back.

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