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October 18, 2017

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What To Say In Every Job Interview

You’ve been preparing for your interviews; you’ve been reading books about the questions and answers and you’ve been practicing – and you’re still not getting the results you want.

What’s not working for you? Why aren’t you getting invited back for a second interview or received a job offer? What can you do to improve your chances in this competitive job market?

There may not be simple answers to those questions, but one thing is for sure: if you continue doing the same thing over-and-over and continue to get the same results – nothing is going to change. (Albert Einstein described this repetitious pattern of behavior as the definition of “insanity.”)

If you want different results to happen, something has to change. This would be a good time to start thinking out-of-the-box; and, a good time to change the way you’ve been preparing for your interviews. If you are willing to let go of what you’ve been doing, and are now willing to try something new – I have a book for you to check out.

The first step on the way to change is to visit a bookstore. The bookstore can be online or an actual store. If you search under the category of “Career Books,” you will find a wide variety of books on the subject of job interviews. Many of these books deal with Questions and Answers:

•“101 Smart Questions,”

•“101 Great Answers,”

•“201 Best Questions to Ask,”

•“301 Smart Answers,”

•“How To Ace the Interviewer’s Questions,” and the list goes on and on.

These books work well if you are focusing only on the questions and answers that take place in an interview. The problem is that you don’t know what questions will be asked in the interview, or what the interviewer is looking for.

If you really are ready to try something new and change your thinking, this book would be a good place to start. STOP thinking about the Questions and Answers only – and begin thinking about why the interviewer is asking the question. In other words, what’s the interviewer really looking for in your answer?

Carol Martin -www.interviewcoach.com


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